On the Carpet:

‘Moral distress’ is major contributor to burnout among emergency nurses – FierceHealthcare


Thanks to Julie Atkinson Boatwright and Nurses Unite for this important story:

“Moral distress” can play a major contributing role to burnout among emergency nurses, according to a new report commissioned by the Emergency Nurses Association and published online in the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Source: ‘Moral distress’ is major contributor to burnout among emergency nurses – FierceHealthcare

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Any thought or stories of your own? I’ve quit more than one job due to circumstances that completely precluded ethical, professional, and/or effective nursing practice. Nurses stay to feel like heroes sometimes or to avoid abandoning anyone: in my view their actual impact is to help untenable situations persist and avoid change. What’s your view?

About Big Red Carpet Nurse (1750 Articles)
Along with other stuff I enjoy that pays the bills (a plus!), I'm a budding nurse comic. I plan, like fake Opthomologist Rand Paul, to create my own professional organization solely so it will grant me a Doctorate. In my case, the org will be something like the AANC (American Association of Nurse Comics), and it will (trust me on this point) agree to make me the first ever DNC: Doctor of Nurse Comedy. I'll keep you posted!

8 Comments on ‘Moral distress’ is major contributor to burnout among emergency nurses – FierceHealthcare

  1. Barbara Benton Allen // October 8, 2015 at 5:54 am // Reply

    I am pushing 70 with my sails up and the wind at my back, lol. I avoid burnout by giving myself permission to not always love my job and focus on how much I love my “work”! Feel so blessed to still be able to do the work I love, still full-time!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. poetry in motion // October 6, 2015 at 12:44 am // Reply

    Anyone write a poem about their patient , or read a nice poem that another nurse or patient wrote?
    https://tjhrn.wordpress.com/2012/07/29/anyone-enjoy-poetry/ here ‘s one

    Liked by 1 person

  3. IT is not only ED nurses who experience burn out. How about a poll, how many nurses go in on their day off if asked or called? YOU feel like you cant let them down You go , and then you are over tired at work , those are the days when most accidents happen.
    How many nurses have had burn out , just wanna quit and stay home?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Absolutely, Fanny. ERs face relatively uncontrolled & unpredictable risk, but most nurses face risk, often poorly trained, poorly equipped, poorly supported. Often & perhaps typically thrown out like worn out cogs once hurt. It’s a systems​ issue, deep and pervasive.

      Like

  4. Julie Boatwright // October 5, 2015 at 8:21 am // Reply

    I completely agree with your comment regarding nurses feeling like they need to be the hero and work ridiculous hours with no breaks prolongs the agony of everyone involved. Forgive me for paraphrasing my take on your “About the Big Red Carpet” post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paraphrase freely, I love comments! It feels good to be able to more than others, tolerate worse, etc., but it
      s also a recipe for disaster that does no one any service in the big picture. Few nurses value or even acknowledge our situation at a group level​ or over time. They settle for mere survival through today, and that’s what they get, at best.

      Like

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