On the Carpet:

Have you ever felt handcuffed to your house?


Social isolation is both a contributor to mental illness, and a consequence. Stigma adds much difficulty and pain and fear and shame to a life already burdened with an unfair share of all of the above. To the extent that we attack the pervasive isolation in modern life, and erode stigma with open minds and open conversation, we can make countless lives that much better.

living in stigma

Yes, it felt as if I was handcuffed to my house.

Sounds dramatic, doesn’t it?  But for countless years, and at times even today, depression = dark fog and black clouds.  Recalling my most difficult years of major depression, that’s the way things were.

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About Big Red Carpet Nurse (1750 Articles)
Along with other stuff I enjoy that pays the bills (a plus!), I'm a budding nurse comic. I plan, like fake Opthomologist Rand Paul, to create my own professional organization solely so it will grant me a Doctorate. In my case, the org will be something like the AANC (American Association of Nurse Comics), and it will (trust me on this point) agree to make me the first ever DNC: Doctor of Nurse Comedy. I'll keep you posted!

4 Comments on Have you ever felt handcuffed to your house?

  1. I find any sort of social interaction returns a departure many fold from depression

    Like

  2. Funding Help // January 20, 2015 at 10:41 am // Reply

    This is my future? Yuck – Home bound and with a disability, I can only hope that I can reach my goals. General depression, medications, physical therapy is a crummy way to live life. I think goal setting and support from others to reach and obtain your goals is an important factor for recovery. Certainly goal setting and support clearly isn’t a cure all. However it is a great start!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve knowns LOTS of people wiht chronic mental illnesses over the years, form work and elsewhere. Far more often than many suffers imagine, life gets much better in time. Whatever builds up your supports and other resources help your odds. Whatever builds up your overall health and fitness also helps. Refusing to five up and settle on inadequate treatment also helps. For many people, it’s not that they’re untreatable, it’s that treaters so far have failed to help. VERY different! – Greg

      Liked by 1 person

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